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I was reading the paper a few weeks ago at a local grocery store and ran across this article written by a local doctor:

“Once the cause of the incontinence is deemed to be an incompetent sphincter, the treatment typically involves the use of drugs that act by tightening the urinary sphincter via hormones (testosterone in males and estrogen in females) or sympathomimetic drugs (phenylpropanalamine). These drugs all have significant side effects and the risks need to balanced against benefits.

There are a variety of alternative methods to the drug route that address the cause of the incontinence. These options have minimal or no negative side effects while actually delivering positive side effects.

Chiropractic care is a relaxing non-invasive technique with many benefits, including: reducing pain associated with subluxations; improvement in nerve function by releasing compression; and improvement in musculoskeletal and internal organ function. The nerves that control the bladder exit the spinal cord between lumbar vertebrae 3 and 4, and those that control the urinary sphincter exit the spinal cord at the sacrum. If there is any impingement of these nerves, function will be impaired. Pelvic asymmetry, sacroiliac joint instability, and lumbar subluxations can also be associated with urinary incontinence. Chiropractic care has a proven track record for resolving these issues.”

This is interesting…“Chiropractic care has a proven track record for resolving these issues (incontinence).”

What’s even more interesting is that this article is talking about dogs and is written by a veterinarian in the East Bay, Karen Rettig, DMV for the Bay Woof (September 2010).  The article explains that “the nerves that control the bladder exit the spinal cord … and those that control the urinary sphincter exit the spinal cord at the sacrum,” which is also true in humans. I have heard from multiple patients that their incontinence improves with chiropractic care. To be clear, I don’t treat urinary incontinence, but often times the issue is resolved on its own when I make skeletal adjustments because the nerve signals can travel more efficiently. The body is amazing!

In fact, this article reminded me that I should have my 10 month old puppy checked out by a chiropractor, so I brought him to an animal chiropractor (that practices under a vet). The animal chiropractor found a few early signs of spinal issues, which he attributed to jumping off of high areas. After locating the issues he adjusted Samson, which my dog seemed to enjoy.