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This is a legitimate question. Flushing medications down the toilet contaminates our drinking water supply and harms marine wildlife. Leaving them in your medicine cabinet increases the likelihood of taking the wrong medication, or worse, gives teens the opportunity to steal the prescription drugs and sell them for recreational use at school, which is a growing problem. Now the DEA has launched a campaign to dispose of the medications properly. I hope there is a good response.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 15, 2010
Contact: DEA Public Affairs
Number: 202-307-7977

Over 3,400 sites join DEA Nationwide Effort
to Take-Back Prescription Drugs On Sept
. 25

SEP 15 WASHINGTON, D.C. – Less than a month into the Drug Enforcement Administration’s prescription drug “Take-Back” campaign, over 3,400 sites nationwide have joined the effort that seeks to prevent increased pill abuse and theft. Government, community, public health and law enforcement partners will be collecting potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs for destruction at these sites all across the nation on Saturday, September 25 th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Many Americans are not aware that medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are increasing at alarming rates, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, many Americans do not know how to properly dispose of their unused medicine, often flushing them down the toilet or throwing them away – both potential safety and health hazards.

“The National Prescription Drug Take-Back campaign will provide a safe way for Americans to dispose of their unwanted prescription drugs,” said Michele M. Leonhart, Acting Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration. “This effort symbolizes DEA’s commitment to halting the disturbing rise in addiction caused by their misuse and abuse. Working together with our state and local partners, the medical community, anti-drug coalitions, and a concerned public, we will eliminate a major source of abused prescription drugs, and reduce the hazard they pose to our families and communities in a safe, legal, and environmentally sound way.”

“With this National Prescription Drug Take-Back campaign, we are aggressively reaching out to individuals to encourage them to rid their households of unused prescription drugs that pose a safety hazard and can contribute to prescription drug abuse,” said Acting Deputy Attorney General Gary G. Grindler.  “The Department of Justice is committed to doing everything we can to make our communities safer, and this initiative represents a new front in our efforts.”

“Prescription drug abuse is the Nation’s fastest-growing drug problem, and take-back events like this one are an indispensable tool for reducing the threat that the diversion and abuse of these drugs pose to public health,” said Director of National Drug Control Policy Gil Kerlikowske. “The Federal/state/and local collaboration represented in this initiative is key in our national efforts to reduce pharmaceutical drug diversion and abuse.”

Other participants in this initiative include the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy; the Partnership for a Drug-Free America; the International Association of Chiefs of Police; the National Association of Attorneys General; the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy; the Federation of State Medical Boards; and the National District Attorneys Association.

Collection sites in every local community can be found by going to www.dea.gov (and below). That site is continuously updated with new take-back locations.
AL CASCIATOSOUTHERN POLICE STATION850 BRYANT STREETSAN FRANCISCOCA, 941331 mi.Map
AL CASCIATOCENTRAL POLICE STATION766 VALLEJO STREETSAN FRANCISCOCA, 941331 mi.Map
AL CASCIATOTENDERLOIN POLICE STATION301 EDDY STREETSAN FRANCISCOCA, 941022 mi.Map
AL CASCIATONORTHERN POLICE STATION1125 FILLMORE STREETSAN FRANCISCOCA, 941153 mi.Map
AL CASCIATOMISSION POLICE STATION630 VALENCIA STREETSAN FRANCISCOCA, 941104 mi.Map
AL CASCIATOPARK POLICE STATION1899 WALLER STREETSAN FRANCISCOCA, 941173 mi.Map
AL CASCIATORICHMOND POLICE STATION461 6TH AVENUESAN FRANCISCOCA, 941184 mi.Map
AL CASCIATOBAYVIEW POLICE STATION201 WILLIAMS STREETSAN FRANCISCOCA, 941245 mi.Map
OAKLAND POLICE DEPARTMENTOAKLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT455 7TH STREETOAKLANDCA, 946076 mi.Map
ANTHONY BATTSANTHONY BATTS
CHIEF OF POLICE
OAKLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT455 7TH STREETOAKLANDCA, 946076 mi.Map
AL CASCIATOINGLESIDE POLICE STATION1 JOHN YOUNG LANESAN FRANCISCOCA, 941126 mi.Map
AL CASCIATOTARAVAL POLICE STATION2345 24TH AVENUESAN FRANCISCOCA, 941167 mi.Map
KENSINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENTKENSINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT217 ARLINGTON AVE.BERKELEYCA, 9470711 mi.Map
BERKELEY POLICE DEPARTMENTSAN PABLO PARK2800 PARK ST.BERKELEYCA, 9470411 mi.Map